Hooked up to God — 012311

There isn’t a thought Mom thinks nor an action Mom takes that isn’t communicated to her directly by God.  “That’s great!”, you might say.  “She could’ve hooked up with soap operas,” and of course, I agree.  Sort of.

There are some who would say that Mom has achieved that place in life where she is practicing what the Apostle Paul recommended: never-ending communication with God.  He talks to her all the time and there is no attempt on her part to use the brain He gave her for anything other than what He commands — including her selection of clothing each morning.  That’s not intended to sound like criticism.

In a recent post, I talked about how old people will try anything to keep some control over their lives.  An apt and personalized simile might be that Mom  is sinking her anchor deeply into a belief system in order to keep her ‘ship’ in place during the storm that is the latter part of her life.

Mom is always glad to see us.  Increasingly, these days, she is overjoyed, even when we visit every day; even when we step into her room twice in the same day.  It’s always new for her.  This, by itself, may be a manifestation of her dementia.  After she’s completed her inventory of how everyone is, she launches into the latest day’s worth of instructions from God.

This was a subject of discussion at our Care Plan meeting a couple weeks ago.  No one wanted to say that Mom is delusional.  No one wanted to alter a behavior that was grounded in good.  The best we could come up with was that this is a very “touchy” subject.  The medical professionals present took notes.

I don’t know what to think.  I don’t know how to respond.  The best I can do is to listen attentively and nod my head without showing doubt.  I wonder what my siblings think.

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Today’s CBS Sunday Morning told a story about Alzheimer’s (video) that is worthy of ten minutes of your time.

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About FredMarx

Old enough to have wisdom; young enough to learn.
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2 Responses to Hooked up to God — 012311

  1. Michael Marx says:

    Well, this sibling thinks that we’re all a little bonkers in one way or the other. There are, of course, several pathological disorders which create a need for an external explanation for any internal problem. When Joy and I were being tested for our psychological fitness to adopt a child, it was discovered that we had an “unusual affinity to God.” The Christian psychologist who was reporting this to us said: “It’s a bit embarrassing to tell two missionaries that they are over-dependent on God’s leading for their lives.

    I agree, this is Mom’s anchor. More so, her faith is her foundation. I talked with her for over two hours this past weekend; or better, she talked to me about many of her experiences during the war and afterwards. She said: “When I talk about what God has done, I can go on for a long time. Small talk and normal conversation is difficult for me.” I think for the moment her highest priority is to be a blessing to all and a burden to none. Since both are not 100% possible, this occasionally leaves her in quite a quandary.
    ~Michael

  2. Well, this sibling does not have an issue with it (don’t roll your eyes). Mom has been through a tough 59 years with Pop, as well as his tremendous sickness and death. Throughout her life her only solace was in the comforting arms of our Father, and now her only intimate relationship is with Jesus.

    Of course, her current behavior does not come as a surprise. It is her intent to know the will of God for her every action and not to wait for the harvest (1 Cor and John) but to do God’s work right away.

    I know you know all this, but I believe she is living the life that God intended…free of Pop yet confined by her own earthly limitations. She is trying to live a life that is pleasing to God. Is this delusional? I don’t think so. It is not much different than who I want to be. The only difference is that she has the label of “dementia” and I don’t.

    Or do I?

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